BOOK REVIEWS
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sholes jacquelynJACQUELYN SHOLES (PhD, MFA, musicology, Brandeis University; B.A., music and mathematics, Wellesley College) serves on the musicology faculty at Boston University and teaches as visiting faculty at Boston Conservatory (beginning Fall 2018). She has held visiting faculty appointments at Brown University, Wellesley College, and Williams College. She is currently President of the New England Chapter of the American Musicological Society and served as Acting Co-Director (with Lewis Lockwood) of the Center for Beethoven Research in Spring 2018. Her research focuses on musical meaning and narrative and on issues surrounding reportorial canons, particularly in music of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries.

Her first book, Allusion as Narrative Premise in Brahms’s Instrumental Music (Indiana University Press, Spring 2018) examines the ways in which Brahms appears to weave allusions to the music of other composers into broad, movement-spanning narratives that reflect Brahms’s attempts to define and articulate his own historical position. Sholes is currently guest editing an issue of Nineteenth-Century Music Review focusing on the influence of Beethoven on Brahms and his circle. She has authored articles and reviews in such journals as 19th-Century Music, Nineteenth-Century Music Review, The Journal of Musicological Research, and Notes. Her work has been presented at meetings of the American Musicological Society, Society for American Music, German Studies Association, and Nineteenth-Century Studies Association and at the North American Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music. She has also done interdisciplinary consulting work with neuroscientists at MIT resulting in co-authorship on a publication in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Her current projects continue to explore issues surrounding narrative and the canon, as well as connections between music and literature, national identity, math, and science and technology.