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Volume 37

In 1994 the American Association of Higher Education (AAHE) began a new project, "From Idea to Prototype: The Peer Review of Teaching," designed to enhance the quality of university teaching by developing strategies for the peer review of teaching that were analogous to disciplinary peer review of research and creative…
The College Music Society's Committee on Professional Development exists to help members acquire information and skills necessary for survival in music in higher education as the field approaches the twenty-first century. Traditionally, the Committee has focused its efforts on the broad category of music in general studies. This seems likely…
When planning faculty development opportunities it is easy to overlook the resource we have in our colleagues. My university has sponsored many development opportunities that featured the expertise and leadership of external consultants, and recently it sponsored a program that tapped the expertise of our own faculty. The goal of…
Schubert is so endlessly performed, recorded, analyzed, psychoanalyzed, contextualized, and fought over that it needs to be asked what is gained by making a special fuss over his two-hundredth birthday. Yet here we are in the midst of it, and it's turning out, despite a relative lack of "blockbuster events"…
Happy New Year! May this be a productive and rewarding year for you, both musically and professionally. The College Music Society greets 1997 with reorganization completed, new programs underway, and new facilities available. We owe special gratitude to our Past President, Nohema Fernández, who has completed an impressive term at…
Among readers' concerns expressed in David Willoughby's Readership Survey were that we should "Ease up a bit on the politically correct, world-ethno-music" and that "the emphasis on ethnomusicology and world music further dilutes time and interest in our Western art music traditions and strongly contributes to its demise-so sad." These…
What does it mean that we perform, study, and teach music in a "post-modernist" period? The term itself might be conceived in either of two ways: (1) If we hyphenate the word as "post-modernism," it signifies, relatively straight-forwardly, that a "modernist" view of the world is passé. The term suggests…
Have you read the "The Eastman Colloquium on Teaching Music as a Liberal Art," published last year as CMS Report Number 10? In 1990 Robert Freeman gathered some marvelous teachers—Samuel Adler, Truman Bullard, Kenneth Levy, George Todd, and Robert Winter—at Eastman to discuss their teaching. Their descriptions of what they…
At its meeting last October the Board adopted a new Mission Statement for The College Music Society. The wording was worked out by Board members J. Peter Burkholder (musicology) and Robert Weirich (performance), who deserve special thanks, but it draws together ideas from the whole Board. The new statement is…
The College Music Society was founded in the late 1950s, by a committee of college and university music professors led by Harvard's G. Wallace Woodworth. This was a time when the nation's largely new university music departments were getting staffed by European scholars. There was a great deal, of course,…
It gives me great personal pleasure to deliver the Robert Trotter Lecture to this annual meeting of The College Music Society. You see, exactly 25 years ago this month, I was fortunate to have the first of what would become a series of informal, professional mentorings from the late Bob…
On 26-29 September The Eastman School of Music hosted a symposium on "Popular Music and the Canon: Old Boundaries Reconsidered." The event brought together current Eastman students and faculty, alumni, community members, and other interested musicians, in series of concerts, master classes, lectures, papers, and panel discussion. Symposium events were…
Members of some tribes in the American West believed that a child did not truly exist until it had acquired a name. For them the answer to the question "What's in a name?" was a matter of great importance. But what we choose to call something can also betray intractable…