Volume 41

I read with interest Professor Dinos Constantinides' article regarding the training of composers and their attitudes toward their audiences in the January 2001 Newsletter. His observation that "audiences and the young composer have different basic music experiences" is of course more true today then ever before. Indeed, the same can…
As CMS continues to reflect the concept of an "umbrella organization" in music, I've been wondering what things it might do that aren't being done for young musicians. It seems to me that a real lack in the music area has to do with how we keep up with some…
As a follow-up to my two previous articles regarding the future of new music in the 21st century, I would like now to share thoughts from a different perspective. As mentioned before, the composer of the second half of the 20th century, and specifically in the late 1950s, was plagued…
The most significant issue for teachers of undergraduate music history and literature courses is that there is far more music history and literature than there used to be. Thirty years ago, at most schools all music majors took the same music history sequence, with a focus on European music in…
Change in academia is about as fast as continental drift. Tectonic movement may be slow, but every now and then there's an earthquake, and one is overdue in higher education. Imagine the possibilities if the walls of all the departments were to tumble down; in the aftermath of the cataclysm,…
As a musicologist, I frequently think about my role in both music and general education. What is the role of musicology and music history in college education? Is there a difference between musicology and music history? If so, which is more in tune with the goals of education in this…
This article was stimulated by the provocative thoughts expressed in the article by Robert Weirich, which appeared in the March 2001 Newsletter. Are music specialists isolating themselves within their respective branches of the discipline, thus heightening fragmentation within the music unit? I'd like to suggest essential integration -- integration by circumstanceas…
In my inaugural statement as the CMS Board Member for Composition, I raised a concern regarding the split of the common concert-goers from music produced by our composers in our times and throughout most of the twentieth century. This is a situation that is not shared with the other arts…
In my three years as Board Member for Musicology, I have had the opportunity to discuss curriculum with CMS members from a wide range of teaching institutions. Whether from small, liberal arts colleges in rural settings or large, research universities in urban settings, my colleagues who are teachers of music…
  Most of us teach a topic beyond our expertise at some point, whether we do so as volunteers or by administrative dictum. As an ethnomusicologist at a small liberal arts college, I've had several unexpected teaching assignments. In fact, during my first semester at Colorado College, I was assigned…
In recent years, the portfolio in college and university music program has been promoted as a tool to assess student development. As universities and colleges are increasingly being asked to develop appropriate methods to evaluate all aspects of a student's growth, it would be appropriate for music programs to consider…
Much has been written about the apparent rift between composers and audiences during the 20th century. While enjoying complete freedom to cultivate highly personal styles of expression, composers have remained most hopeful about sharing their musical creations with a broad-based public. Unfortunately, the current state of affairs in the professional…
From January through May, 2000, the various CMS Regional Chapters sponsored panels that addressed questions surrounding "cross-teaching," that is, teaching outside one's professional area [see May 2000 Newsletter, p. 4]. The panels were not intended to eliminate the problem, but rather to open discussion, identify concerns, and possibly offer guidance…