Back Home Components Scholarship and Research Volume 16

Volume 16

In Milo Velimirovic's excellent, forthright article "The Profession of Musicology: Today and Tomorrow," there lies, almost hidden among much that I find both stimulating and convincing, one viewpoint with which I am in such strong disagreement that I must reply. Prof. Velimirovic wrote: "I submit that the institution of the…
The years 1975 and 1976 have more than a little in common with 1939, the year of my graduation from the Eastman School of Music. At that time the country was still suffering from the effects of the Great Depression, and already the ominous march of Hitler and Mussolini's armies…
Ethnomusicology seems to have survived another quarter-century and appears to be concluding the millennium on an upswing. The word ethnic is no longer rejected by the comparative musicologists and, on the contrary, promises to be one of the burgeoning catch-words for unlocking the spoils of the National Endowments for the…
Concerns which face music educators in the nation's schools are varied. Most stem from the impact of change as it relates to education. Some are recurring problems, such as the relatively low priority accorded arts education in the mass education system, or shrinking career opportunities for musicians. Others are the…
  "MEMORANDUM TO: All College and University Administrators FROM: Legislative Task Force on Education SUBJECT: Faculty Accountability A legislative task force recently completed a study of faculty loads and effort at all institutions of higher learning in the state. Their summary report recommended the following minimums for all full-time faculty…
This is an abridged version of an address prepared for the CMS meeting in Rochester on Nov. 14, 1975. Not long ago, I received an interesting circular from a group known as "Advocates for the Arts." I should like to quote, verbatim, the first two sentences: "If you've gone to…
One of the ubiquitous problems which confronts the average college music professor in a liberal arts setting is the confrontation of the musical world with that of the liberal arts, i.e. the humanities. Though we pride ourselves on being part of the humanities, we are still in a world foreign…
What is music? What does it require to understand music? To these questions one might answer, "Very basically, music is an aural art; to learn to understand it, one must study with one's ears." To further elaborate, one might say, "Using our ears, together with our cognitive and creative tools,…
Many of the ideas in this article were formulated with AnneMarie de Zeeuw in the preparation of Sight-Singing and Related Skills, de Zeeuw and Foltz (Austin, Texas: University Stores Inc., 1973). To anyone who is aware of the content of the college level sight-singing class during recent years, it has…
The Newberry Library, Chicago, contains a distinguished music collection, rare book, manuscript, and print holdings, and archives relevant both to the United States (and its Indian populations) and to the city of Chicago. Thus it is understandable that a small special codicil, which entered the Library holdings in 1948, should…
Most agree that ties between music theory, history, aesthetics and performance are not often clear in the conservatory and college training of young musicians. The advantages of such an integration have already been advocated eloquently in the College Music Symposium and elsewhere by performer-musicologists such as George Houle and Denis…
The directions that the arts are taking in public education are endemic to what is or should be taking place in teacher preparation. This is truer today than it used to be just a few years ago. With the current drop in enrollments at every level of the public school…
Up to now we have thought of the performer-as-teacher in the following terms: 1) The performer is a person of special talents in playing, singing, conducting. These talents have been developed by unremitting discipline in practice and have been refined by years of performing before the public. 2) This person…
The Quality of Life and the Education of the Musical Amateur1 Unprecedented numbers of young people are studying music as a major subject or performance medium in U.S. colleges, universities and conservatories. Although the college enrollment is declining, the number of music students is growing. Between the fall of 1968…
Between September and December of 1974, as preliminary research for a forthcoming book on the Collegium, I explored the activities of early music ensembles and their directors on campuses of 30 American Colleges and Universities.1 Like most of my fellow directors, my knowledge of Collegia derived primarily from my experience…
Like a twin shooting star seen fleetingly in the firmament, talea and color make the briefest of all possible appearances in the typical music history textbook, receive scant attention, and vanish forever into the night. The apparitions usually occur somewhere between pages 106 and 116—in connection with a discussion of…