Volume 18

A developing movement of several years came to fruition on November 19, 1977, at Evanston, Illinois, with establishment of the Society for Music Theory. The new organization was established by formal action of approximately 150 music theorists participating in the Second National Conference on Music Theory, held in conjunction with…
The primary objectives of the Pilot study, supported by a grant from the research division of the National Endowment for the Arts, were to identify and define significant factors of training and career experiences, develop data-gathering instruments and techniques permitting a detailed analysis of educational and career influences, and to…
Philosophical, acoustical, and numerical considerations were not separate in the ancient world. They could be separated neither from each other nor from the overriding symbolism which informed and at times united them. It is difficult enough to embrace the idea of a synthesis of these channels of thought, but it…
The music of Josquin des Prez has long been admired for its compelling compositional logic. One marvels at the consummate integration of the simplest motivic cells into large musical structures of architectural perfection. Thus quite understandably, for centuries, teachers of composition and analysis have recommended to their students a detailed…
Some performance anxiety, a few butterflies, perhaps a dry mouth, are symptoms that seem to be almost universal to musicians. In fact, there are many great musicians and teachers who insist they must experience pre-performance anxiety (even to the point of nausea) or they will not perform at their best…
The difficulties encountered by administrators of music programs faced with the need for fair and equitable load distribution among staff members are unique. No other discipline offers the variety of instructional situations: individual and group applied instruction; straight lecture (as in music history); lecture with studio (as in music theory);…
Interpretation through Style Analysis1 From the historian's point of view, a composer writes his music in the context of a style. This means that the resources available to him and his contemporaries comprise a normative language, a common domain of materials, techniques, and conventions from which unique compositions may be…
Applied music teachers are continually faced with the problem of finding for their intermediate students materials from the classical period which combine substantial musical content with limited technical demands. The music of J.W. Hertel assists admirably in solving this problem. Many of his works, originally written for eighteenth-century amateur musicians,…
In presenting to students the materials of his discipline, the musicologist normally has recourse to words.1 This hardly seems strange, but there is reason why it should. The attempt to describe one language (in this case, music) in terms of the paraphernalia of another (speech) can lead to complications. The…
A fear of memory loss is extremely common among performers. Many are loath to admit to it, as if to do so would cause it to happen. Whether acknowledged or not, the anxiety is evident in dreams, jokes, and off-hand comments which express the sense of horror over the prospect…
In the academic world of the 1960s the professional student was often a source of concern. Undergraduate education at a prestigious or not-so-prestigious liberal arts college, followed by a leisurely two or three years of master's degree work, foreign study travel on one government grant or another, and a number…
For the first time in sixteen years, the United States played host to a Congress of the International Musicological Society attended by scholars, performers, and professors from thirty-three different nations many of which had not existed in 1961, the date of the last American meeting. The Congress theme, "Interdisciplinary Horizons…
In May 1976 the Organization Committee for Higher Music Education (OMUS) gave its official report Music—Man—Society to the Swedish Government. It is to be the basis of a total reformation of higher music education in Sweden. There are mainly two reasons why such a reformation should be brought about just…
Four years ago Richard Graham described the field of music therapy for COLLEGE MUSIC SYMPOSIUM readers, basing his article on the "official" definition of music therapy as given by the National Association for Music Therapy, Inc. (Graham, 1974). He elaborated on the definition, taking its elements of music, therapy, therapist,…
On January 16, 1964, David Merrick produced in the St. James Theatre in New York City a new musical comedy based on Thornton Wilder's play The Matchmaker. The principal character of the play and the musical is a professional busybody named Dolly Gallagher Levi, and when Dolly made her entrance…
Each year, several hundred on-campus students at the University of Wisconsin—Oshkosh complete traditional music courses in non-traditional ways. General students earn credits in Music Appreciation—a variable credit course—through self-study of its modularized content in multimedia instructional packages. They attend no group sessions, and many of them find it unnecessary to…
During the spring of 1946 posters announcing a concert of 14th and 15th century music for Monday, the 20th of May, appeared at various places on the Yale campus. The program was to be given in Sprague Memorial Hall by the "Students of Advanced Theory" under the directorship of Paul…
Reduced to its quintessential form, the question most frequently asked concerning Baroque concerts and recordings over the past twenty-five years would be as follows: "How does one manage to impart an easy and natural flow to the music, so that the meter, structure, and phrasing of the poetry comes through…
Productivity Models for Applied Music ProfessorsWritten by Samuel A. Floyd, Jr.Burt K. Kageff, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale—Symposium Volume 18 The current heavy emphasis on scholarly productivity in American universities has generated much discussion regarding what should be the nature of scholarly productivity for professors in the performing arts. Some…
The Corcoran Gallery's "Portrait of a Musician" by Rembrandt—signed and dated 1633—presents the iconographer with a maze of problems and a multitude of contradictory hypotheses. Although the Corcoran labels it a portrait of Heinrich Schütz by Rembrandt, there has been considerable controversy surrounding both the identity of the musician and…
I Analytic reduction, with its implicit recognition of music as a multi-leveled structure in which surface complexities conceal more basic underlying patterns, forms one of the cornerstones of Heinrich Schenker's theory of tonality. Schenker's work is well known today, and there are few theorists active who have not been influenced…
Warren Dwight Allen states in Philosophies of Music History, "The neglect of music with words is the most glaring defect of modern textbooks on musical appreciation."1 Song has primarily been analyzed for its forms rather than for the way in which the composer has attempted to express the words. "Music…
The rationale for the existence of the Doctor of Arts degree is the often-heard complaint that college professors may be experts in their respective fields but that they do not know how to teach. Typically, they have never had a course in effective teaching or a supervised practicum in which…
The arts in higher learning are rapidly changing. Some of this change is a response to pressures from outside institutions while some is created by faculties within them. Whatever the source, change occurs within a philosophical framework and in the evolution of practice and content of academic artistic endeavors. The…
The doctoral dissertation which should be the culmination of a doctoral candidate's education, unfortunately turns out to be the downfall of some. There are no exact figures on the number of doctoral students who have the A.B.D. (All But Dissertation), because there are so many variables which cloud the picture.…
Wherever a sizable Latin American group settles, its music seems to exert a strong influence on the musical tastes of its new neighbors. Outside of Latin America, the largest Latin American communities are found in the United States—close to a third of the people of Miami are Cuban-American; one out…
Six years ago, when the U.S.A. was only 196 years old, SYMPOSIUM (1972, Vol. 12, pp. 94-102) took a quizzical but unashamed look at the angled thickets of "Star-Spangled Bibliography," suggesting the national anthem in all its aspects as a topic ripe for interdisciplinary study—more attention to interdisciplinary studies having…
Author's Note: Upon re-acquainting myself with what I wrote so long ago, I sometimes felt a snarky imprint of a 40 something whippersnapper; but a whippersnapper who truly CARED. While exceptions abound, I am also struck by how slightly I feel things have changed in the past 35 years, especially…
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second in a series of brief articles—which began in our last issue—requested from the Research Center for Musical Iconography (RCMI), International and American National Headquarters of Répertoire International d'Iconographie Musicale (RIdIM). An article describing the founding and objectives of the RCMI was published in this…
Almost daily the media are reporting on the prospects of reduced budgets and enrollments in colleges across the nation. If these forecasts are correct, many college music faculties are facing rather unpleasant and uncertain futures. In the face of these dire predictions, the profession must take action to maintain its…
In these days of shrinking student enrollment and possibly diminishing monetary support for the fine arts in the community, it would seem an appropriate time to re-assess our attitudes toward the function of music within a school environment as well as society as a whole. At a time when the…
Though presented almost as an afterthought in his Unconscious Beethoven, Ernest Newman's thesis regarding the tyranny of the formula over the musician's imagination offers an attractive point of departure for investigation into the precise nature of that composer's melodic invention. In fact, Newman himself made significant strides in the direction…
In Volume 11 of SYMPOSIUM, a group of graduate students, many of whom have gone on to distinguished careers, discussed the topic "Undergraduate Preparation for Graduate Study in Music." Some of the comments made were: "[The undergraduate school] failed me by providing an inadequate library and neglected to introduce me…
In 1974, a Presidential Advisory Committee Report raised basic questions about the purposes of a contemporary college education. Certainly the level of informational competence in our graduates has risen higher and higher. However, the level of professional knowledge necessary to the practice of the professions, determining what knowledge is useful…