Volume 20

From a hasty perusal of this year's CMS program (1979), I can only conclude that there are but few of us reckless generalists still about, ready to cover the entire history of a country's musical activity, or at least one part of it, in something like 30 minutes. I hope…
In September 1978 the Music Department of Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York welcomed the first class of entering freshmen chosen by the faculty of Kingsborough and the membership of Local 802 of the American Federation of Musicians as candidates for the CUNY baccalaureate degree program…
Liszt refused to place Beethoven's works in periods. He would divide them, instead, into two categories. The first, that in which traditional and recognized form contains and governs the thought of the master; and the second, that in which the thought stretches, breaks, and recreates, and fashions the form and…
I Historical/stylistic periods in music are both useful and perplexing concepts; they simultaneously clarify and hinder one's perception of a given period and a given work. Part of the difficulty arises from a general lack of agreement as to what constitutes these epochs. Attempts to mix characteristics of geographic areas,…
Carlos Castaneda reports many astonishing events he experienced while studying with don Juan, a Yaqui Indian sorcerer.1 During the time of Carlos' tutelage his ordinary perceptual skills were sharpened and transformed to such an extent that he was able to realize "the sorcerer's description," a dichotic perception of the world…
Comprehensive musicianship as a factor in the structure of music curricula in secondary schools, colleges, universities, and conservatories has been in existence long enough for trends and attitudes to have emerged which permit observation and comment. A recent article by Leland D. Bland in SYMPOSIUM (Fall 1977, pp. 167-174), "The…
With the death of Ernest Bloch on July 15, 1959, the world of music lost one of its profound and influential voices. But the spirit of Bloch lives enduringly in the rich legacy he left as a creative artist and as a teacher. On March 10, 1962, Ivan Bloch, the…
Iconography of the viol was the theme of the special project for the 1978-79 academic year sponsored by the Research Center for Musical Iconography. Based at City University of New York, the Research Center is the American branch of RIdIM, the Répertoire Internationale d'Iconographie Musicale. The viol exhibit, Series B/3,…
In a recent article for this journal Barry S. Brook discussed the function of oral history in musical research, its special advantages to historians, and the distinctions between oral and written documents.1 Oral history, he noted, provides "the intimacies, the subtleties, the inflections—the sound and sense of a life history"…
During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, numerous treatises on music made the analogy between musical composition and Greek and Latin theories of oratory and rhetoric.1 After all, the stirring of emotions and the qualifications of affects in the Baroque era in general were hardly the exclusive domain of music; they…
I hope you will forgive me the use of a recent but already worn cliché, but before addressing the challenge for the decade ahead of us I think it appropriate to reflect upon our present status as we begin the year 1980. The cliché to which I refer is the…
It must be one of the effects of the Fall of Man that research and teaching, which ought to be helpmates and friends, so often fall out and when they meet at all, it is only to compete bitterly for our time and energy. This glum thought has occurred to…
William Kimmel was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1908. He went to college in Naperville, Illinois, receiving his A.B. degree from North Central College. He received his M.M. and Ph.D degrees from the Eastman School of Music in 1935 and 1942 respectively. From 1935 to 1947 he taught music at…
Higher education is embarking on a particularly difficult journey as it approaches the 1980s. Its role as a vital force in society is being challenged, and the arts as well as other academic areas and services provided by the postsecondary community will be subject to some level of examination. It…
. . . As the extreme possibility of Dasein, death is capable of the greatest lighting-up of being and its truth.1 Martin Heidegger   It would appear, perhaps, . . . that all works [of art] could be defined through their rapport with the categories of Death, and that before…
In the two great civilizations of China and Greece, music had such a central position that its history represents a chronicle of the relationship between man and his universe. There are many parallels in the meaning and function of music to be found in both cultures. Early Greek culture has…
Composing, performing, publishing, and research have long been the primary criteria for decisions about retention, promotion, and tenure within the college music teaching profession. However, good teaching has come to be an almost equally important factor, particularly within the last decade. Yet few issues in higher education generate as much…
I. BACKGROUND AND HISTORICAL CONSIDERATIONS Throughout the annals of recorded history relatively few composers of outstanding merit and magnitude have decidedly concerned themselves with the general musical education of the young—that is those masses of children who are beginning or in the early stages of their formal school studies, and…