Back Home Components Scholarship and Research Volume 26

Volume 26

As music educators we recognize the importance of having a finely developed aesthetic sense. We understand what music means to us and the reason for its value, both to children and adults, and therefore to the school curriculum. Throughout the history of educational reform this was obviously not always the…
To deal with a student's poor intonation appropriately, a teacher must know the specific cause of the problem. Many causes exist, most of which can be fairly easily detected (if not always so easily eliminated). These include lack of practice, lack of coordination, an untrained ear, and such "mechanical" problems…
Current discussions of the crisis in music education often define the "cutback problem" in public school music as a failure in public relations. To overcome the present dilemma, music educators are encouraged to organize support groups, marketing strategies, and publicity campaigns. While these suggestions are valid, it is unlikely that…
The difficulties that today's performers experience with dynamics when performing American psalm tunes, fuging tunes, and anthems from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries appear to fall into three categories: the lack of any dynamic markings at all, the placement of the terms that do appear, and the length…
What passes today in many textbooks and classrooms as harmonic analysis is the result of a misconception, historically understandable but pedagogically barren. At the root of the misconception lies the confusion—or at least fusion—of thorough—bass practice and harmonic theory. We shall follow the harmful implications of this want of distinction…
Recently, a long-lost manuscript of music by John Abraham Fisher (1744-1806) came to light in the shop of a London bookseller.1 This manuscript, entitled Music For The Opening Of Macbeth [1780], is Fisher's autograph of a musical setting of the witches' scenes in the first act of Shakespeare's Macbeth. The…
In 1790, the year before Haydn's triumph in London and Mozart's death in Vienna, Ernst Gerber proclaimed that Leopold Kozeluch was Europe's favorite composer: Leopold Kozeluch is without question with young and old the generally most loved among our living composers, and this with justification.1 Two years later, the Bohemian…
Remembering Walter Gerboth, who had a lively interest in musical humor. Twenty-five years ago, as Music Librarian of Brooklyn College, he took pains to impress this raw beginner with the ideals of the academic profession of music. Trying to explain a joke—especially a well-known one—can prove a risky business. Still,…
For the last three or four years, Music in General Studies has been a primary topic of discussion and writing. The report of the College Music Society's 1981 Wingspread conference sought to encourage interest toward ". . . developing discerning judgment about and keener responsiveness to music."1 At least two…
Motets were one of the most important polyphonic art forms of the thirteenth century. Appropriate pieces were performed both in church and at court—as service music in the former and as chamber music in the latter.1 Several collections are extant that are devoted almost exclusively to the genre or that…
Reducing a folk melody to its pitch spectrum does not fully elucidate its development, and few participants in an oral tradition consciously follow scalar dicta. Nonetheless, an awareness of the tonal material of a folksong is essential to the broader understanding of the idiom that that song represents. Much confusion…
Major changes in the education of prospective college music faculty were advocated at the 1984 Dearborn Conference on Music in General Studies. The arguments were valid and well presented as a statement of the problem, but somewhat less so when it came to proposed solutions. Joel Stegall advocated a straightforward…
Das neue Handbuch der Musikwissenschaft, edited by Carl Dahlhaus, takes its place alongside Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart and The New Grove as one of the monuments of musicology since World War II. In the introduction to volume 5 of the Neues Handbuch, Professor Dahlhaus, drawing on a most…
"Forms of art reflect the history of man even more truthfully than do documents."—Theodore Adorno   GENERAL EFFECTS OF WORLD WAR I ON EUROPEAN SOCIETY AND SCHÖNBERG World War I affected almost every person and establishment in Europe. When the costs were finally counted there were some ten million military…
As the importance of research for all university professors increases, the application of research to the area of applied music is still vague. Consider Martin and Berry's paradox: a university hires a professor mainly to teach, but retains or promotes him almost entirely on the basis of his scholarship.1 In…
I. INTRODUCTION Although much has been written and discussed concerning the pedagogy of music theory, the pedagogy of composition has traditionally been left almost entirely to the individual teacher. Several authors have suggested specific approaches: the importance of improvisation,1 the holistic method,2 the collective experience,3 the heuristic process,4 and student…
The single-movement sonata form was the supreme type of instrumental music in the Classic era, although Classic composers themselves apparently shared no general concept of the internal organization therein.1 Only in the Romantic period did the term "sonata form" acquire in conventional usage a more specific meaning as a structure…