Volume 27

Events occurring in educational systems throughout our nation over the past few years have stimulated a good deal of thought, self-examination, and some new ideas concerning music education. The following thoughts were generated by seventeen years of college teaching experience and are personal opinions formed out of a deep concern…
Should the study of popular music be considered a part, perhaps even an integral part, of the public school music curriculum? In 1967, music educators, philosophers, industrialists, scientists, theologians, governmental representatives, and others meeting in Tanglewood, Massachusetts answered that question: Music of all periods, styles, forms, and cultures belongs in…
Critical Language and Musical Thought in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries1 Though the worth of interdisciplinary approaches to the study and teaching of music history is generally assumed, in practice our efforts to relate music to the other arts often prove artificial and confusing. Knowing that connections do exist, we…
Learned considerations of the music of Béla Bartók commonly embrace either of two seemingly disjunct spheres of inquiry. One group of observers, including Downey, Bratuz, and Dobszay,1 has scrutinized the influence of Bartók's impassioned study of folk music upon his original compositions, often concluding that a genuine understanding of the…
  Like many colleges and universities, the University of Southwestern Louisiana (USL) has employed a means for assessing the productivity of its faculty for several years. In this system, each member of the faculty must complete a three-page "Faculty Self-Evaluation of Performance Form" annually (see Appendix 1). The completed form,…
The supremacy of Roman numerals in shaping tonal music analyses has eroded considerably in recent decades. Though more cumbersome, the graphic techniques of Schenker and his followers have taken hold in the minds of many analysts. A new conception of harmony has emerged, and linear factors are now much better…
Teaching Seventeenth-Century Concepts of Musical Form and Expression: An Aspect of Baroque Music1 For decades there have been proposals to update, improve, and to achieve greater student interest in college music history courses. Rare, however, is the college or university music curriculum giving instructors the freedom for very much innovation,…
In the Autumn of 1966, my first term as a teacher, it fell to me to offer a graduate course on "Music in the Eighteenth Century." It was part of a two-year-plus sequence of courses at the University of Chicago, conceived as a comprehensive, if basically conventional, history survey. The…
The First Movement of Beethoven's Opus 132 and the Classical Style* The works of Beethoven's last period, the years 1813-27 broadly defined, have come to occupy a special place in the history of Western music. They are thought to contain some of the most profound utterances of their composer, or…
Absolute pitch recognition, more commonly known as "perfect pitch," has been a controversial subject for much of the past century.1 Is the faculty inborn or is it acquired? Is it a measure of musical talent? The recent literature is filled with opposing views of its worth, running the gamut from…