Volume 40

Olivier Messiaen, along with Arnold Schoenberg, must be considered as one of the most important composer-teachers of the twentieth century. As with Schoenberg, several composers of note studied with Messiaen, some of whom attained international stature. At the top of the list are Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Iannis Xenakis;…
A Perceptual Learning Hierarchy: An Imperative for Aural Skills Pedagogy1   During the summer of 1999 three important music cognition conferences were held: MusicCog/99 at the Ohio State University; the Conference on Musical Imagery at the University of Oslo, Norway; and, the Annual Meeting of the Society for Music Perception…
  IntroductionRationale for the new designCourse designTypical week's lessonComplete course materialsEvaluation resultsStatistics on web useCorrelation between web use and performance in the coursePedagogical possibilitiesConclusion Introduction Like many who teach music listening or music appreciation courses, I have sought ways to promote more active learning by my students. In 1997, inspired…
  IntroductionCMPRetrospectTodayToolsBlueprintNextReferences Introduction The notion of needing to reform music education has probably been around since our profession's inception. In the past fifty years, we have seen remarkable improvements in many areas of music education. It is probably safe to say that, on the whole over this period of time,…
I. The Past In comparing music theory pedagogy in the mid-1960s with current thinking today, some battles have been won while others are still being fought. Some of the hot-button topics mentioned in the given articles have cooled off but, interestingly, many of the issues from the past still incite…
O. M. Hartsell's excellent piece seems as relevant today as when it first appeared in 1972. His admonition to include more diverse (world/ethnic/indigenously cultural) music into the curriculum seems even more important than it was three decades ago. Indeed, this was a recurring theme from almost every writer in the…
In its most cherished formative texts, both sacred and secular, the medieval world encountered the notion that music had measurable therapeutic value. From the story of David and Saul, perhaps the oldest account of applied music therapy that we possess, through Cato, Cicero, Macrobius, and of course Boethius, music was…
The problems of tempo in Puccini's soprano arias are surprisingly vexing for performers, given that the composer provided many indications in his scores, including many metronome markings, and supervised the preparation of several singers who went on to make early phonograph recordings of his arias. The difficulties arise from the…
For this millennial issue of College Music Symposium, I was invited to use George Houle's 1974 article, "Performance: The Profession and Preparation for It" as a springboard for sharing thoughts related to music performance and music programs at institutions of higher education. In Volume Fourteen of Symposium, Professor Houle and…
Every year, lately around August or September, music libraries around the world receive a very large blue book: the latest annual volume of RILM Abstracts of Music Literature. Every year we know it will be heavier to lift, perhaps a few millimeters thicker, with approximately 1000 more entries than the…
The Woman in the Music 1(On Feminism as Theory and Practice) At night in any kind of light, in twilight, candlelight, lamplight, and worst of all by moonlight, it becomes bars! The outside pattern, I mean, and the woman behind it is as plain as can be. . . .…
Irritations. Did our esteemed editor assign me to respond to "In Support of Art" because he thought it would irritate the ethnomusicologist in me? Well, Richard Franko Goldman did present a point of view strongly, writing with a self-righteous tone and a bit of hand-wringing, trying to make some of…