Volume 43

Béla Bartók's Sonatina for piano (1915) is a fascinating and appealing work, eminently suitable as an introduction to Bartók's larger works. An early composition, it provides an excellent preview of Bartók's mature oeuvre by revealing his meticulous organizational thinking, his solid grounding in classical theory, and his incorporating of folk…
Last year a graduate student in musicology at the University of Connecticut took an independent study with me on the music of Maurice Ravel. While in the end his work was insightful and successful, he was quite frustrated and discouraged at the beginning and even the middle stages. In analyzing…
For most of us employed in schools, colleges, and departments of music in higher education in the United States, teaching is a matter of intuition. Often we are good teachers; we can be engaging in the studio or classroom, and we can point to our high scores on the end-of-semester…
For more than two hundred years, writers have quoted Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle's classic remark: Sonate, que me veux-tu? Why should these few words have captured the imagination of so many writers? His question was most likely a verbal bon mot that began to be quoted by others in…
The diversity of our population is one of our greatest strengths as a country. Yet, we still encounter problems when the interests of the majority or dominant group conflict with those of minority groups. Though this "hegemony" of one group over another has marked our interethnic history, we are now…
2002 Robert M. Trotter Lecture, presented at the CMS National Conference in Kansas City on September 27, 2002. Before beginning my prepared remarks, I wish to pay tribute to two musician/teachers whom I truly consider to be personal mentors. One is Michael Rogers (University of Oklahoma) who has been very…
In the year 1831, the music critic for Iris Ludwig Rellstab covered the Bonn Gesangverein's performance of Don Giovanni directed by the twenty-one-year-old Johanna Kinkel (then Mockel). In his review, he wrote that "the director, strictly speaking, was no director but only a surly woman one."1 Six years later, in…
Seldom does a composer parody his or her own style, and even more rarely does that composer acknowledge doing so. Yet the Czech composer Josef Suk does precisely this in a short piano lullaby entitled "Self-Parody on a Street Song" (1912). In this miniature, Suk appears to be lampooning one…
An Examination of the Latin American Stocks in the Library of Congress1 The mixing of Jazz with Latin American music during the 1930s and 40s initiated a reciprocal appropriation of performance styles by both American and Latin-American musicians. Some of the resultant fusions from this exchange include the Latin Jazz…
Ethnomusicology, for at least the last forty years, has been primarily an idiographic discipline. That is, ethnomusicologists' research has focused on the description of particular music systems and music cultures at the expense of either nomothetic (positing or discovering scientific laws) or comparative approaches. The practical effect of this focus…
It has been almost fifty years since Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings of 1925-19281 were first recognized in print as a watershed of jazz history and the means by which the trumpeter emerged as the style's first transcendent figure.2 Since then these views have only intensified. The…