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Volume 45

Introduction It would be difficult to overstate the impact the blues had on American music in the twentieth century. In his 1993 book, The Land Where the Blues Began, Alan Lomax states, Although this has been called the age of anxiety, it might better be termed the century of the…
Despite recent attempts at interdisciplinary study, the sciences and humanities are still marked by a significant emphasis on specialization. This situation often reinforces the traditional, and seemingly unbridgeable, gulf separating notions of objective, empirical science and subjective, metaphysical arts. Such a state of opposition continues to manifest itself in many…
Scholars often approach the study of twentieth-century music by distributing it into a number of schools or isms. As a result, we have become accustomed to labeling twentieth-century music in terms of stylistic categories such as impressionism, expressionism, and primitivism to name just a few. This traditionally segregated approach to…
The increasing importance of professional development is one of the most dynamic trends emerging in the arts within higher education. Publicly funded institutions in particular are increasingly relying on entrepreneurship as a means to prepare students for musical careers. For example, the University of Colorado at Boulder and The University…
"He is a good musician, who understands the music without the score, and the score without the music. The ear should not need the eye, the eye should not need the (outward) ear."1 Hearing music in the mind's ear, without any sound source present, is a skill long prized by…
Toward Analytic Reconciliation of Outer Form, Harmonic Prolongation and FunctionWritten by Kevin J. SwindenSymposium Volume 45 Grieg's "The Song of Siri Dale" is a G minor setting in Grieg's op. 66 collection of Norwegian Folk Songs for solo piano. As one might expect of a folk song, Siri Dale's melody…
Since David Lewin summarized his ideas about "transformational theory" in Generalized Musical Intervals and Transformations,1 it has become an increasingly fruitful approach to thinking about music. In particular, one group of transformations has proven useful in approaching nineteenth-century chromaticism. These are the ones derived from some relations explored by Hugo…