Volume 49

Since its publication in the eighteenth century The Poems of Ossian has been shrouded in controversy, resulting in an overshadowing of its influence on music. Most who encounter literature that mentions The Poems of Ossian will be dissuaded from interest in the poems, since the majority of writings dismiss the…
Memorizing is essential for the solo pianist, thanks to a long tradition dating back to the nineteenth century. Requiring solo piano recitals to be performed from memory, however, is not without controversy. While memorizing comes naturally to some musicians, others struggle to at least some extent. Opponents of memorized performance…
The early years of The College Music Society, the 1960s, were a time when a considerable amount of attention was being given to pre-collegiate and professional education. The reason for this was the national concern about the country’s scientific competitiveness versus the Soviet Union, after its launching of the Sputnik…
Beginning especially during the last two decades of the twentieth century, a new vision and movement for liberal learning in higher education—that of the “engaged” institution dedicated to “engaged” learning and to the public good—emerged in the United States.1 This concerted trend has emphasized the ways in which liberal learning…
There is a need to teach the young people who will be doing the science themselves, but this will always be a small minority among us. There is a deeper need to teach science to those who will be needed for thinking about it, and this means pretty nearly everyone…
We Need To Change The Way We Teach There is no way around it! We need to change the way we teach higher education courses, whether in the humanities or the sciences. The reasons are many and varied. First, the time available to courses has drastically diminished, while the amount…
    A performing musician devotes mental energy to two mutually dependent but distinct tasks: production of musical sounds and assessment of one’s own performance. A continuous feedback loop occurs, and careful listening leads to adjustment of phrasing, intonation, balance, style, tone, etc. There is a limit, however, to how…
  Introduction: Evoking Childhood Musically Carnival of the Animals. Children’s Corner. Mother Goose. Musical depictions of the childhood experience have attracted a wide spectrum of composers, reaching an apex in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Since such music generally makes limited technical demands and features accessible melodies, diatonic harmonies, and…
Just as Dorothy had to overcome her fear of lions and tigers and bears in The Wizard of Oz, so too have collegiate faculty been encouraged to use new computer-mediated tools in their teaching to facilitate student learning, such as Blackboard and wikis and blogs. Oh my. Despite their somewhat…
Introduction—Betty Anne Younker The examination of pedagogy requires an investigation into principles of learning. One obvious starting point would be to explore the literature of educational psychology and the psychology of music teaching and learning, with a focus on learning theories, cognition and perception. This literature contributes to our understanding…
As The College Music Society reaches its fiftieth anniversary, it is fitting that we look back on developments in college music teaching over its first fifty years. In the teaching of music history, I see five major areas of change during that time: repertoires, narratives, materials, goals, and strategies. These…
College applied studio teaching has been examined, evaluated, and criticized in recent decades, but it has remained in place, unchanged in most ways due to the inherent “conserving” nature of the music conservatory, or to what Schlueter refers to as an “unquestioned adherence to tradition.”1 Music teachers, music educators, and…
Japanese composer Koji Nakano, like many young Asian composers, left his native country to continue his study of music composition techniques in the Western art tradition. Although he was exposed to various kinds of Japanese traditional music throughout his childhood in Japan, it was not until much later in his…
The separation of ethnomusicology from musicology attests to an intellectual history whose continuing validity has come into question. Differences between a discipline committed to fieldwork and one that traditionally was devoted to historical research have been blurred from both sides. Increasingly, critical musicologists turn to contextualizing practices in opposition to…
Getting gigs, finding students, and building an audience for art music is a tough challenge in the world of the IPod, YouTube, and big-screen TVs, but it is in the interest of every musician today to be proactive in developing new avenues for performance, audience development, and music education. Though…
 Background Evaluation is an integral component of music performance and instruction, an activity in which musicians engage at many levels, ranging from processes that are very informal and spontaneous to very formal processes that occur within highly structured settings. Informal evaluation includes activities such as the self-evaluation that occurs throughout…
In the Warring States period of pre-imperial China (475-221 B.C.E.), philosophers warned against the “lewd” and corrupting tunes of the states of Wei and Cheng. The indulgent nature of such music foresaw the demise of the states. Prince Wen of Wei, however, heard them differently. In the Record of Music…
I was curious to see how many people would brave a session with the word “hypnosis” in the title, so I welcome you. As a college music instructor and licensed hypnotherapist, I believe there is a direct link between altered states of consciousness and effective music performance. I hope to…
Teachers’ expectations are inferences made about the future behavior or achievement of a student based on what the teacher knows about the student at the given moment.1 These inferences can eventually cause a student to behave or achieve in ways that confirm the teacher’s expectations. In the wonderfully complex and…
Exposure to contemporary sounds, contemporary musical literature, and improvisation has been a part of the undergraduate music curriculum for several decades. However, such exposure is often in the form of listening with very minimal actual improvisation, and is usually limited to tonal music. One place that undergraduates could actually perform…
This essay summarizes the presentation given by Dr. Rebecca Dodson-Webster and Dr. Shellie Gregorich at the National Conference of the College Music Society in Salt Lake City, November, 2007. Our title, “Making Music Theory Click,” refers to classroom applications of Turning Point’s audience response student radio-frequency response systems known casually…
This is a story of making connections. Several years ago, the entire faculty at Birmingham-Southern College was charged with redesigning the curriculum to strengthen it, and to take the opportunity to think creatively and deeply about how to accomplish this. Our idea was to invigorate the intellectual culture of the…
Thomas Mann published his famous novella Death in Venice in 1912. The plot is easily summarized: Gustav von Aschenbach, a highly respected writer of scholarly works experiences writer’s block and decides to take a vacation in Venice. While there he becomes enamored with the beauty of a young boy named…
Music teacher education programs reflect three different academic traditions: the conservatory, the normal school, and the liberal arts college or university. Gradually emerging over a 150-year span, four-year programs of preparation required for certification or licensure to teach in the public schools became commonplace in the 1950s. Since that time,…
Introduction How might a music teacher remain culturally relevant to today’s adolescents? Each generation of teenagers would like to believe that they originated songs of love and lust and other topics deemed too vulgar for polite society, yet history tells us otherwise. While on the surface Cole Porter and hip-hop…
Personnel directories of music departments across the United States, even those at small colleges, reveal an abundance of names.1 Insiders know that, in many cases, the majority of those listed are not full time faculty members, but rather hold adjunct positions, titled variously “instructor,” “lecturer,” “artist,” and so on. The…
Recently, there appears to be growing interest in including aspects of social justice and/or social consciousness in education. Conferences on these topics include the Fourth International Conference on Teacher Education and Social Justice held at the University of Illinois in January 2007, the Creating Balance in an Unjust World: Conference…
The importance of Edgar Allan Poe’s influence on Maurice Ravel has been well established, but the nature and extent of Poe’s influence remain unclear. One of the few works by Poe that Ravel had read was “The Philosophy of Composition,” a theoretical-didactic essay in which Poe described the process he…
As issues of multiculturalism and globalism have recently become increasingly important in classrooms and in academic circles, media industries have responded by producing a plethora of sources on music and culture. While the abundance of materials has made it possible to diversify our curriculum, it has not made it easy:…
The Society’s invitation to speak about relationships between the Center for Black Music Research and the profession at-large is a distinct honor. I am delighted today to have the opportunity to outline a scholarly and musical journey that has taken place over the course of nearly four decades. In 1972,…
Performance is, in certain respects, the primary branch of the subject that we teach in music departments and schools: it is a deeply formative part of every music student’s training; it is the experience that most often brings students into the study of music at the college level; it is…
This paper is the result of years of teaching both music history and world history. Formally a musicologist by training, my experience with the world history curriculum has afforded me a broad perspective of Europe’s position in the context of the larger sphere of world history. As a result I…
In the course of any academic career, a scholar will witness changes—some of them monumental, others more subtle—in the way that research is performed as scholarly interests wax and wane, as new questions emerge and find or elude solution, as methods are developed, tested, instituted, and adapted to pursue various…
Learning Aids: Images and Biofeedback Target Training incorporates biofeedback techniques, visual stimuli, aural stimuli, verbal descriptions, and kinesthetic practice. The use of verbal and written descriptions of muscle interaction in conjunction with anatomical diagrams allows the students to know where and how to produce the targeted articulation. It is highly…
 Introduction: Genesis of the Program In teaching composition, I frequently say to my students, when they do not know what to write next in a piece, “Go back and look at what you have already written. Chances are that the idea for what to do next will be found there.”…
It has been my privilege to have been given opportunities to serve both CMS and NASM. Thus, I am pleased that this year they are again meeting concurrently, since from its inception, the founders of CMS sought to reach out to its sister organizations. In 1964, during the Trotter presidency,…
  Introduction The College Music Society’s initiative on Academic Citizenship—the final piece in the Society’s larger initiative on Career Services—was unveiled at the Salt Lake City annual meeting on November 15, 2007. A three-member working group (Anne Patterson, Chair, Fairmont State University; David Montano, University of Denver; John Winn, Eastern…
In November 2007, at the Fiftieth Annual Conference of The College Music Society in Salt Lake City, members of the CMS Committee for Career Development and Entrepreneurship (CCDE) presented a discussion session on the future of music careers. The presenters were Derek Mithaug, Director of the Office of Career Development…
Right-brain thinking and emotional intelligence, or EQ, have recently become buzzwords. Daniel Pink’s book A Whole New Mind1 lays out the case for the importance of right brain, creative/emotional thinking. The subtitle of the book is Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. According to Pink, creativity and right-brain thinking are the…
Thinking about the ins and outs of the teaching of composition during the past fifty years meant continuing a lively internal and external dialogue: What do composers need to know, and when do they need to know it? And, given the rock of the pop industrial complex on one side,…
In the 1950s, a pianist named Martin Denny made a percussion-heavy recording of a tune called “Quiet Village.” This recording reached Number 4 on Billboard’s Hot 100 music chart and became the most popular song on Denny’s Exotica album (1957).1 The term Exotica has since been used to refer to…
Introduction: Choral Music in Estonia The importance of song and choral music to the cultural life of countries in the Baltic States has led to an abundance of choral music and choirs with varied voicings and purpose. From casual singing at the beginning of a town meeting to the use…
Introduction Many teachers of music theory are intrigued by the idea of including popular music as an addition to the traditional music already taught in theory classes. Music familiar to students offers the opportunity to demonstrate a connection between academic material and music the student has already internalized. Educational theorists…
The movie that gave us the phrase, “Klaatu! Barada! Nikto!” is not only an important science-fiction film, but also arguably one of the most significant films of the 1950s. Furthermore, it elevated the emerging genre of cinematic science-fiction above “junk or kiddy fare”1 and addressed more mature themes than one…
On October 16, 1912, at the Choralien Saal in Berlin, Arnold Schoenberg conducted the premier performance of one of the twentieth century’s most influential works of music. From its origin as a straightforward commission for a musical melodrama accompanied by piano to its position as what Stravinsky called “ .…
  Introduction In his 1981 article “Prince Henry as Absalom in David’s Lamentations” Irving Godt examined a group of seventeenth-century English settings based on King David’s laments for his son Absalom and his friend Jonathan.1 On the basis of the information available to him, Godt was unable to establish whether…
The Amis is the largest indigenous minority group among the twelve officially recognized aboriginal tribes in Taiwan. Most of the Amis people reside in the eastern valleys that lie between the two coastal cities, Hualien and Taitung. The Amis are well known for their sophisticated multipart singing styles. During the…